Jamie Kadavy Owner / Certified CCW Instructor

Jamie Kadavy has been in the Army Reserve for 15 years now, 8 1/2 of which he has been an E-6 (Staff Sergeant), and soon to be an E-7 (Sergeant First Class).

Mr. Kadavy, who grew up in Mead, Neb., joined the Army Reserves in 2002 at age 20 to be a part of something bigger than himself, he said. In 2003, he was deployed for the first of three tours to Iraq.

He was the lead MK19 gunner (Fully Automatic Grenade Launcher) for half of his missions with the 308th T.C., and the other half he was the truck commander of an unarmored 915A3. Within 1 year and 6 months of Mr. Kadavy joining the Military, the Army promoted him to Sergeant.

During his first tour there was a sign leaving FOB Scana just before you left the gate to head North farther into Iraq that read “Is today the day?”  Those words greeted Jamie Kadavy frequently as he escorted Military convoys in Iraq. In his work as a convoy escort, roadside bombs and ambushes were a daily reality. The sign was a reminder.

“Any day could be the last day, so I have to make sure I can do my best and that I’m effective,” he said.

During his first tour one note was he was part of a combat operation called “Operation Black Watch” This was a joint mission with the United Sates Army and the British Military to retake the military base Dog Wood that was overrun with Terrorist. The President of the United Sates requested that the best unit be put on this mission, and the Army gave that mission to the 308th T.C. Mr. Kadavys Unit.

Mr. Kadavy’s 2nd tour in 2006 he was a Team Leader, Gun Truck Commander and Assistance Convoy Commander. During this tour his roll was strictly convoy escorts, and he went all over Iraq. During this time in the Iraq war, the Military news paper Stars and Stripes declared that Military Convoys and Convoy Escorts “Gun Trucks” was the most dangerous job in Iraq due to the high number of combat engagements, injuries and fatalities. His 2nd tour was extremely dangerous, his convoys that he was escorting was hit nearly 100% of the missions they went on.

Mr. Kadavy’s 3rd tour in 2009 he was a Team Leader, Gun Truck Commander and Escort Commander.  During this tour he was also strictly convoy escorts and went all over Iraq. During this tour he also assisted with Gun Truck SOPs for the safety / intelligence brief before they would roll out on convoy escort missions.  After Mr. Kadavy and his unit left, the battalion command kept the Gun Truck SOPs and made it the standard operating procedure during convoy / combat operations that were used right up till the end when the United Sates pulled the remaining troops out of Iraq.

During all of his tours he ran every where in Iraq from the large bases to the very small bases that only had a grid number. He worked with all the branches of the US Military and some of the UN forces that joined the fight.

During his tours he was engaged in combat over 60 times from everything from Small Arms, Machine Guns, Mortars, RPGs, EFP’s, VBIED’s, Grenades, to all the odd IEDs that have been out there. He even had to clear 1 building during his first tour.

Mr. Kadavy along with Audra Wirth were interviewed and recorded of the experiences being deployed three times and the combat engagements along with adjusting to being home. These are now in the Veterans History Project, American Folklife Center and the Library of Congress as part of American history of the Iraq War.

“One of my fondest memories of being home for leave was Audra and I went to Mount Rushmore, we arrived later in the evening and stayed to see fireworks. During this time Audra and I were asked from the crowd to fold the American flag.” Mr. Kadavy went on to say “I have never felt so proud and humbled for the honor to fold the American flag at Mount Rushmore. This was an an amazing experience and opportunity that I will never forget.”

After he returned to the states in 2010 he has been a Squad Leader and Assistant Platoon Sergeant.

Mr. Kadavy has been a range safety office and weapons instructor for the 443rd Transportation Company for many years. He has trained and mentored hundreds of Soldiers with a multitude of weapons including but not limited to the M9 Pistol, M11 Pistol, MK 19, M2 .50 Caliber Machine Gun, M249, M16A2, M4 Carbine, and the 240B.

His duties as a range safety office and weapons instructor include but are not limited to:
Ammunition Inspection
Maintenance of each weapon
Clearing Procedures of each weapon
General Disassembly of each weapon
Inspection of each weapon
Cleaning of each weapon
Preventive Maintenance of each weapon
General Assembly of each weapon
Safety and Functions Check of each weapon
Operation and Function of each weapon
Ammunition Loading of each weapon
Unloading and Clearing of each weapon
Cycle of Operation of each weapon
Performance Problems of each weapon
Sluggish Operation of each weapon
Stoppages of each weapon
Immediate Action of each weapon
Remedial Action of each weapon
Pistol Marksmanship
Machine Gun Marksmanship
Rifle Marksmanship
Grenade launcher Marksmanship
Proper Grip training
Aiming Consulting
Breath Control training
Trigger Squeeze training
Target  Engagement training
Firing Positions training
Combat  Marksmanship training
Techniques of Firing training
Target Engagement training
Provides clarification on the prohibition of using contractors as range officers in charge
Updates signage and flag requirements
Modifies Army requirements for use of batwing surface danger zone
Provides additional danger zones information, to include tabular data, for firing small arms
Adds range safety information for small caliber dummy, drill, and inert ammunition
Adds range safety warnings for nonlethal weapons used on operational training ranges
Adds requirement for exercise emergency action plans
Updates and adds technical data in the text, figures, and tables
Checks and verifies each Soldiers weapon on the range for safety
Checks and verifies each Soldiers weapon off the range for any rounds still in the chamber

Additional Training:
Urban Operations, Riot Control, Traffic Control, Search & Detaining Procedures, Combat Life Saver, Public Relations for Foreign Policies, Hand to Hand Combat, Vehicle Search Procedures, Defensive and Offensive Driving, Military Weapons Specialist, Recognition of Improvised Explosive Devises, Recognition of Vehicle Born Improvised Explosive Devises, Various Documentation of Daily Engagements, Radio & GPS Communication Expert, Mine Awareness, Hot/Cold Weather Injury Prevention, Law of Land Warfare, Personnel Recovery, Management Control, Risk Management, Media Awareness, Ammunition Handler, Anti-Fratricide, Warrior Leadership Course, Senior Leadership Course

Awards and Decorations:
Meritorious Service Medal | Army Commendation Medal (3rd Award) | Army Achievement Medal | Army Good Conduct Medal (3rd Award) | Army Reserve Components Achievement Medal (3rd Award) | National Defense Service Medal | Iraq Campaign Medal / With 3 Campaign Stars | Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal | Global War on Terrorism Service Medal | Armed Forces Service Medal | Armed Forces Reserves Medal With M Device (Bronze Hourglass)| NCO Professional Development Ribbon (2nd Award) | Army Service Ribbon | Overseas Service Ribbon (3rd Award) | Combat Action Badge | Weapons Qualifications Badge’s | Driver and Mechanic Badge | Meritorious Unit Award (3rd Award)

Mr. Kadavy’s whole military career he has been in charge of Soldiers, helping them train to fight and stay focused on the mission.

In 2016 Mr. Kadavy became a certified pistol instructor for the NRA. He believes that every law abiding American should have a Concealed and Carry license. With his experience deployed in the Military he has been in situations while under close range fire that directly relates to the Shoot / Don’t Shoot situations.

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